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The materials and information included in this Latest News page are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the page are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.



CATCH THE BUZZ

Change At Beltsville. Jeff Pettis Steps Down.

By Kim Flottum

After nine productive years, Dr. Jeffery Pettis is stepping down as Research Leader of the USDA-ARS Bee Research Laboratory (BRL) in Beltsville, MD, and will devote his energy to his research program and collaborations with colleagues and beekeepers. Dr. Pettis guided the Laboratory through the turbulent times of Colony Collapse Disorder and helped build a balanced staff devoted to improving bee management and bee health. He did this while maintaining a strong research program focused on queen and colony traits and managing bees for pollination. Drs. Judy Chen and Jay Evans will serve consecutive 120-day terms as Acting Research Leader of the BRL, prior to the naming of a new Research Leader for the group. Through this process the BRL will remain focused on maintaining close collaborations and connections with the beekeeping community as we all strive to reduce the impacts of stress and disease on bees.

A Note From Jeff Pettis

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

 

I would like to address the recent decision by ARS to change the leadership of the Beltsville Bee Laboratory. While I have strong reservations about this decision, I do not wish to challenge it. The truth is I have been stretched too thin over the past few years to meet all the demands of the Research Leader position and my own research. The administrative aspects of my job as Research Leader have suffered because my research took precedence over administrative responsibilities. I am looking forward to a full return to an applied research agenda focusing on addressing your concerns as stakeholders.

 

Looking toward the future direction and leadership of the lab, it is important that you, the stakeholders have a direct line of communication to the decision makers who drive the research agenda. I am very proud of the relationship I have built with the industry and feel this is crucial to meeting your needs through research. Please continue to be a strong voice with ARS.

 

I appreciate the tremendous outpouring of support from all of you and I look forward to working with you as before. As always, I will continue to conduct research with the stakeholders' best interests in mind.

 

I thank you for the support and I look forward to our continued partnership in addressing beekeeping and pollinator health issues.

 

Thanks

Jeff Pettis


 



 

National Honey Board Calls for Research Proposals to Seek Ways to Increase U.S. Honey Production 

Firestone, Colo., July 1, 2014 – The National Honey Board has issued a call for research proposals to study how to increase U.S. honey production. The goal of the study will be to provide the National Honey Board as well as the U.S. honey and beekeeping industry with possible strategies and action steps to proactively address ways of increasing U.S. honey production. 
 
“Many ideas have been mentioned as possible causes of declining honey production,” said Bruce Boynton, CEO of the National Honey Board. “This project could take any one of several directions, from looking into declining forage, changes in agricultural crops, re-seeding with crops that are less favorable to honey production, and challenges to maintaining the health of the honeybees.”
 
The deadline for proposals is October 15, 2014.  Proposals will be reviewed and considered for funding in the Board’s calendar year 2015 budget.
 
The National Honey Board is an industry-funded agriculture promotion group that works to educate consumers about the benefits and uses for honey and honey products through research, marketing and promotional programs.

 

The Costly Lobbying War Over America's Dying Honeybees

By Clare Foran

The insect world's biggest murder mystery is moving to K Street.

Honeybees—pollinators that serve as the matchmakers of the floral kingdom—are dying off in droves, frightening environmentalists and scientists who fear the unfilled natural niche that collapsing bee colonies leave behind. Those concerns hit the national stage last month when President Obama launched a federal investigation to find out what is driving the decline.

All of that has made the pesticide industry nervous. Environmentalists have long argued that a widely used class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonics for short, are a major cause of bee die-offs. And green groups are hoping that White House attention—combined with a growing body of scientific evidence that points the finger at chemical crop treatments—will lead to an all-out ban on the pesticides.

For the industry, that would be a major dent in sales. In 2009, neonics accounted for $2.6 billion in profits industry-wide.

In an effort to protect their product, pesticide makers are loading up on high-powered lobbyists. Bayer, the largest manufacturer of neonics, has signed former House Majority Leader Dick Gephardt's firm to lobby on the issue, according to disclosure records filed at the end of June. Gephardt himself is listed as a lobbyist for the company, along with his former chief of staff, Thomas O'Donnell, and aide Sharon Daniels.

Bayer also signed a contract in April with Cornerstone Government Affairs as part of its honeybee lobbying push.

A Bayer spokesperson declined to comment on the message its lobbyists plan to push. But the company confirmed that it recently hired both lobbying firms, and its line on pesticides has been well-publicized.

"Some critics contend that neonicotinoids may be involved in honeybee losses," Bayer's website proclaims. "However, there has been no demonstrated effect on colony health associated with neonicotinoid-based insecticides."

In addition to its honeybee lobbying, Bayer has launched a public-relations offensive. The chemical giant opened the doors to its North American Bee Care Center in North Carolina in April. And last month, Bayer hosted a reception for members of Congress in Washington to talk about its efforts to help honeybees during National Pollinator Week.

Bayer isn't the only pesticides maker fixing for a fight. Syngenta, the second-largest neonic manufacturer, is registered to lobby on pesticides. A Syngenta spokesperson said the company actively discusses "the pollinator issue" with government officials.

The lobbying push is backed by deep pockets. Bayer ponied up more than $2 million for all of its lobbying efforts in the first quarter of the year, according to lobbying disclosure records. Syngenta, meanwhile, paid out $350,000 in the same interval for total lobbying expenditures.

Environmentalists and public-health and food-safety advocates are also shelling out to make the case that pesticides are killing honeybees, but have spent considerably less cash. The Center for Food Safety, which lobbies against neonics, spent only $10,000 total on lobbying efforts in the first quarter of the year. Friends of the Earth, an environmental group, which contends neonics are the leading cause of bee deaths, spent just under $13,000 in the fourth quarter of last year.

As long as the cause of the declines remains in question, both sides will continue to make their case to the administration and on Capitol Hill. "This issue isn't going away, and what we're starting to see now is lobbying efforts really ramp up," Larissa Walker, the policy and campaign coordinator with the Center for Food Safety said.

The Environmental Protection Agency, which is reviewing neonics, has indicated that it views the link between pesticides and honeybee deaths as far from settled science.

A five-year scientific review of the academic literature released last month reported that pollinators are "highly vulnerable" to neonics. Environmentalists seized on the study as the latest evidence that the chemicals are killing bees.

Pesticide manufacturers, however, say that's simply not true, pointing instead to a host of other factors as likely reasons for a recent decline in native bee populations. One of those factors is the varroa mite, a parasite that preys on bees by drinking their blood.

Democratic Rep. Earl Blumenauer of Oregon has put forward legislation that would require EPA to halt use of the pesticides until a conclusive determination over the link between pesticides and bee health has been either established or disproved. The legislation has little chance of passing, but the European Union has already instituted a temporary, two-year ban on the use of the pesticides, and green groups are hoping the U.S. will do the same.

Meanwhile, bee declines continue at an alarming rate.

Starting in 2006, commercial beekeepers in the U.S. began reporting a loss of nearly one-third of their hives during the winter. Losses last winter were lower than they have been on average during the past eight years. But scientists, beekeepers, and green groups say the rate of decline remains alarmingly high.

Researchers have struggled to explain the insect epidemic, but generally cite stressors—including pesticides, parasites, poor nutrition, and genetics—as likely reasons for the decline.

Pollination is essential to the survival of crops such as apples, avocados, and lemons. Last month, the White House said bee pollination produces $15 billion worth of agricultural yields annually.

"We're at a crisis point here," said Lisa Archer, the food and technology program director for Friends of the Earth. "The question now is whether we're going to listen to the alarm bells that are going off."

This article appears in the July 2, 2014 edition of NJ Daily.



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