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Archived Latest News October 2013

 

The materials and information included in this Latest News page are provided as a service to you and do not reflect endorsement by the American Honey Producers Association (AHPA). The content and opinions expressed within the page are those of the authors and are not necessarily shared by AHPA. AHPA is not responsible for the accuracy of information provided from outside sources.


 

MadeWithHoney.com
Interactive Websites Offered

by National Honey Board

In an effort to provide food manufactures with information about the use of honey as an ingredient in products, the National Honey Board created the MadeWithHoney.com interactive websites. These five websites were launched to provide manufacturers with industry-specific technical, marketing and formulation assistance in the areas of baking, beverage, confectionery, dairy and snacking.


The National Honey Board encourages industry members to utilize the information and content found on these websites to stay up-to-date on the latest food product trends and innovation, as well as the most recent technical data available.

To find out more about these sites, the National Honey Board encourages you to visit MadeWithHoney.com.

www.BakingWithHoney.com: This informative website contains information on baking with honey, including retail and wholesale baking formulas and technical specifications. Some of the newer technical materials include Frequently Asked Questions from the retail and wholesale baking industries, and information on Honey Substitution.

www.BeveragesWithHoney.com: This website offers insight into the expanding beverage industry as manufactures realize the value of using an all-natural sweetener with exceptional flavor and marketing impact.

www.CandyWithHoney.com: This website provides confectionery manufacturers with new product ideas and stories about the latest candy industry trends.

www.DairyWithHoney.com: From ice cream to yogurt, this website offers dairy food and beverage manufacturers the latest information on honey and dairy products made with honey.

www.SnackingWithHoney.com: An online guide to snack food products made with honey, as well as technical and marketing information for using honey in savory and salty snacks.

 

 

 A Message From Our President

I am sure many of you have seen the recent Monsanto press release concerning their commitment to honey bee health at the 2013 Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting. Taking cues from earlier discussions at the PAM sponsored honeybee health symposium hosted by Monsanto this past June it was understood that the AHPA would be supportive of Monsanto’s continued interest in honeybee health. (If you missed the article please go to www.ahpanet.com and click on latest news.)

Some may question Monsanto’s motives for their involvement in the honeybee industry, and therefore, question the AHPA’s involvement with their company. However, just because the AHPA has been invited to participate in discussions with Monsanto does not make AHPA a member of the Monsanto company. If someone gives you a ticket to a football game and you get to sit in the stands it doesn’t make you the quarterback calling the plays. Or if you go to the Daytona 500 and you buy a pit pass that isn’t the same as being an owner of a participating team in the race. Neither does AHPA participating in a meeting make them part of Monsanto nor is it an endorsement of their work. It is AHPA’s intent to inform this group of the AHPA's perspective of the state of the industry and negotiate farming strategies that would be beneficial to our industry.

Going forward, AHPA executive members are invited to participate in many meetings and discussions concerning honey bee health, illegal honey circumvention, etc. Whenever possible the AHPA will be involved in discussions concerning all things pertaining to the honeybee industry.

If modern agriculture is to remain sustainable, I believe all segments of the agriculture industry need to be able to sit down and have an honest conversation of how each stakeholder can have an effect on the other. The American Honey Producers is a solution oriented association that is committed to make decisions based on the evidence of good science.

 



Neonicotinoids: What Will You Do The Day The Buzzing Stops?

By June Stoyer

Neonicotinoids: Designed To Kill

According to the EPA,Neonicotinoidsare defined as a class of insecticides with a common mode of action that affects the central nervous system of insects, causing paralysis and death.By design, neonicotinoids were in fact, created to kill insects, yet industry claims these chemicals are not responsible for the global decline of our pollinators.

Neonicotinoids: All Paths Lead To Death

Initially, the beekeepers referred to the bee decline as "colony collapse” so they could discuss what was happening to their honeybees. However, industry came along and added the word "disorder’, creating the Great Mystery, the black hole into which all discussion descends. We will need endless research to answer the Great Mystery. Colony Collapse is but one of many symptoms, the origins of which can be traced to the neonicotinoids.

"Colony Collapse Disorder is a symptom, not a syndrome.” Tom Theobald, Co-host of The Neonicotinoid View Radio Show. Read More

 

 

Jennifer Sass’s Blog
More research shows neonic pesticides compromise bee immunity

Our Nation’s bees are in a tail spin, and victims include commercial honey bees, wild bumble bees, and other native bee species. This isn’t just a bee problem – it’s our problem too because we rely on the pollination services of our buzzing invertebrate friends to grow food and make flowers bloom. According to the US Department of Agriculture Honey Report, honey production is down, as it has been almost every year since the neonicotinoid pesticides were approved (see graph below from Dr. Susan Kegley, Pesticide Research Institute).

The decline of bee colonies almost certainly has numerous causes. Much of the pesticide industry is focused on pathogens like Nosema parasites and Varroa mites, shifting attention away from their own harmful pesticide products. But, science is bringing pesticides and bee deaths closer together. Read More

 

 

CATCH THE BUZZ

"As an independent convener, Keystone’s mission in this initial scoping phase is to ensure we are building a well-rounded group of perspectives”

MONSANTO ANNOUNCES CLINTON GLOBAL INITIATIVE COMMITMENT TO ACTION ON HONEY BEE HEALTH – AN UPDATED RELEASE

Monsanto recently announced its Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Commitment to Action on honey bee health at the 2013 CGI Annual Meeting. As p art of this announcement, the company committed its support to a coalition convened by The Keystone Center. (The Keystone Center was established to independently facilitate the resolution of national policy conflicts. It is unbiased and impartial in understanding and seeking solutions to society's most difficult challenges).

The Keystone Center is convening a diverse, multi-stakeholder collaboration focused on improving honey bee health. Keystone is currently conducting an assessment phase to help determine who will be involved as well as the scope, mission and goals of the Coalition. It is anticipated that participation will come from sectors including crop production, beekeeping, agribusiness, university, NGO and government. Initial funding for the effort has been provided by Monsanto as part of its CGI Commitment to Action on honey bee health.

"As an independent convener, Keystone’s mission in this initial scoping phase is to ensure we are building a well-rounded group of perspectives,” said Sarah Stokes Alexander, The Keystone Center’s Vice President of Programs. "We’ll be working with diverse stakeholders involved to identify areas of collaboration for honey bee health.”

Monsanto has initially committed to provide support in four priority areas of focus: 1) improving honey bee nutrition; 2) providing research investment in novel technology for varroa and virus control; 3) understanding science-based approaches to studying pesticide impacts on honey bees and increasing awareness of pesticide best management practices among growers and beekeepers; and 4) enabling economic empowerment of beekeepers.

"One-third of our diet is made up of vegetables, fruits and nuts that depend on pollinators like honey bees,” said Jerry Hayes, Monsanto’s Commercial Bee Health Lead. "Honey bees play an essential role in ensuring crop yields—a critical need for global food security. We’re proud to join this coalition and support efforts to improve and sustain honey bee health.”

"If modern agriculture is to remain sustainable, I believe all segments of the agriculture industry need to be able to sit down and have honest and open-minded conversations,” said Randy Verhoek, President of the American Honey Producers Association. "The American Honey Producers is a solution-oriented association that is committed to make decisions based on the evidence of good science.”

Monsanto has been involved with bee research since 2011 when it acquired Beeologics, an organization focused on researching and testing biological products, which provide targeted control of pests and diseases in order to provide safe, effective ways to protect the honey bee. Monsanto also has collaborated with Project Apis m. (PAm) to assist in forage projects in order to provide more nutritious food for bees, and is doing extensive research on the varroa mite.

"The Monsanto funding has allowed us to target honey bee forage plantings before and after almond pollination, times when there is normally a dearth of pollen sources. It’s a win-win for all; natural pollen for bees, and for the farmer—reducing soil erosion, fixing nitrogen and adding organic matter to soils,” said Christi Heintz, Executive Director, Project Apis m., Almond Board Bee Task Force Liaison. "This is an excellent model, and we look forward to working collaboratively to expand this important work.”

In June 2013, a first-of-its-kind Honey Bee Health Summit concluded at Monsanto Company’s Chesterfield Village Research Center. The three-day event hosted by PAm and Monsanto’s Honey Bee Advisory Council (HBAC) included nearly 100 members of the bee community, representing academics, beekeepers, industry associations and government sectors. Summit attendees heard from some of the nation’s top apiculture researchers on the challenges facing honey bees, an important ecosystem service provider and natural pollinator. (Summaries of the talks are available here, and videos or each of the talks are also available here, Editor).

From beekeeping industry experts, Summit attendees and through the counsel of the Honey Bee Advisory Committee, Monsanto has learned a great deal about the complex challenges facing beekeepers. To learn about the challenges facing honey bees and Monsanto’s commitment to improving honey bee health, please visit Monsanto’s honey bee health website.

About the Clinton Global Initiative

Established in 2005 by President Bill Clinton, the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI), an initiative of Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation, convenes global leaders to create and implement innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing challenges. CGI Annual Meetings have brought together more than 150 heads of state, 20 Nobel Prize laureates, and hundreds of leading CEOs, heads of foundations and NGOs, major philanthropists, and members of the media. To date, CGI members have made more than 2,500 commitments, which are already improving the lives of more than 430 million people in over 180 countries. When fully funded and implemented, these commitments will be valued at $87.9 billion.

About The Keystone Center

The Keystone Center is an independent nonprofit organization that engages people and their ideas, informed by good data and technology, to understand and address complex energy, environmental, and public health challenges. Keystone helps resolve difficult issues, both current and emerging, by fostering an environment of trust and respect among leaders who wish to reach action-oriented, sustainable solutions that elevate individual interests in service of the greater good.

Founded in 1975, The Keystone Center began as a forum for decision-makers to escape the confines of their typical working environments and talk to each other face-to-face about tough public policy issues. Over the past four decades, we have carefully honed our approaches to dialogue, collaboration, and consensus building, helping stakeholders successfully bridge ideological and political divisions. Together, we strive for a future in which people share in the ownership of society’s challenges and work together to find solutions.

 

Advocates urge conferees to include bee-protection measures in farm bill

Amanda Peterka, E&E reporter

Published: Wednesday, October 23, 2013

Conservation groups and bee advocates are urging farm bill conferees to use the five-year bill to help strengthen federal protection over pollinator species that have experienced precipitous declines in recent years.

More than 50 organizations today wrote to Senate members of the farm bill conference committee requesting that they retain pollinator protection language included in the House version of the bill. The provision would establish better coordination between federal agencies in dealing with pollinator health, create a task force on bee health, and increase monitoring and research of pollinator populations.

"Maintaining healthy populations of honey bees and other pollinators is essential for the long-term success of American agriculture," the organizations wrote to the Senate conferees, who are led by Senate Agriculture Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and ranking member Thad Cochran (R-Miss.).

Pollinators contribute between $20 billion and $30 billion a year to the nation's agricultural production by pollinating fruits and specialty crops like almonds, according to the advocates.

But in recent years, pollinator populations have fallen dramatically. Managed honeybee colonies nationwide, for example, lost 31.1 percent of their populations last winter, according to an Agriculture Department-funded annual survey conducted by the Bee Informed Partnership and the Apiary Inspectors of America.

In the case of honeybees, scientists call the syndrome "colony collapse disorder" and blame it on a variety of factors, including pesticides and habitat loss.

Under the House farm bill provision, federal agencies like the Agriculture Department and U.S. EPA would be required to increase their interagency cooperation and provide guidance on pollinator health issues. USDA would establish a task force focused solely on bee health and commercial beekeeping.

The provision also calls for increased monitoring and reporting of the losses of a variety of managed and native pollinators, including bees, birds and bats. It also would require USDA to assess whether it should modernize a bee research lab and create a new one.

Reps. Alcee Hastings (D-Fla.) and Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio) offered the provision in the form of an amendment during the House farm bill debate. It passed this summer in a 273-149 vote. Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) offered a nearly identical amendment during the Senate farm bill floor debate, but it never received a vote.

The provision "would be a significant step towards ensuring the long-term viability of populations of honeybees," the conservation advocates said today.

The American Bird Conservancy, American Farmland Trust, Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety, National Farmers Union, National Wildlife Federation, Natural Resources Defense Council, Pesticide Action Network North America, Sierra Club and Xerces Society were among the groups signing the letter.

Farm bill conferees will hold a public meeting next Wednesday in the first step toward reconcilingH.R. 2642andS. 954, the House and Senate versions of the bill (Greenwire, Oct. 23, 2013)

 

Major television production company is now casting for big personalities in the Beekeeping world!

If you or someone you know is a beekeeper with an over-the-top or outrageous personality, and would be interested in appearing in your own TV series, we’d love to hear from you! Please send us a few sentences about yourself and your business, along with a picture, to:

Castingfortelevision2013@gmail.com

Thanks so much and we hope to hear from you soon!

Liz Levenson
Senior Manager of Development
PILGRIM STUDIOS, INC.

 

 

U.S. Beekeepers Urge Americans To
Buy Source-Certified Honey


New logo supports food safety and security


Washington, D.C. – October 15, 2013 – Facing continued decline in their bee colonies and shrinking honey harvests, U.S. beekeepers are urging U.S. consumers to take an easy step in helping preserve the domestic honey business and assure the quality of the honey they choose: Buy source-certified honey.

"Just look for the ‘True Source Certified’ logo,” said Randy Verhoek, president of the American Honey Producers Association. "That logo tells you that the honey you’re buying was ethically and legally sourced. If you don’t see the logo, ask your retailer or honey company to join the program. And make sure that your favorite foods that feature honey – from breakfast cereals to snacks – are made by a food manufacturer who purchases honey from a True Source Certified honey company.

"By taking this simple step, you help ensure quality, and you also help keep U.S. beekeepers in business, by preventing the sale of inferior, underpriced and illegally sourced honey,” he said.

The True Source Certified™ program has been applauded by U.S. beekeepers and honey industry leadership, including the American Honey Producers Association and the American Beekeeping Federation, the two largest organizations for U.S. beekeepers. One of the main reasons is that it provides traceability from hive to table, helping ensure the food safety and security of the honey used in the United States.

To meet its honey demand, the United States imports more than 60% of the honey it needs from other countries. Most imported and domestic honey is from high-quality, legal sources. But some honey brokers and importers illegally circumvent tariffs and quality controls, selling honey to U.S. companies that is of questionable origin – specifically, illegally imported Chinese honey. This threatens the U.S. honey industry by undercutting fair market prices and damaging honey's reputation for quality and safety.

"Cheap illegal imports hurt all legitimate U.S. packers and beekeepers,” said George Hansen, president of the American Beekeeping Federation. "We’re facing the collapse of our colonies on the one hand, and unfair competition in the marketplace on the other. Consumers have the power to help U.S. beekeepers maintain their footing in extremely tough times – and to ensure the quality of the honey they buy.”

Seven honey companies and a number of importers and international exporters are now True Source Certified or registered, representing about one-third of honey sold in North America. Many of the largest grocery retailers and club stores now only use certified honey for their store brands, including Costco (Kirkland Signature) and Target (Market Pantry and Simply Balanced). But the program still has a way to go until consumers can be confident in the source of their honey.

"Interest is growing in the program, but we need the help of consumers to raise the level of awareness and commitment,” said True Source Honey Executive Director Gordon Marks. "We ask people to look for the label, and to check out www.TrueSourceHoney.com if they have questions about the program or want to do more.”

Even with recent indictments by federal authorities against companies illegally importing Chinese honey, there are indications that millions of pounds of illegally sourced honey may continue to enter the United States. In February of this year, two of the nation’s largest honey suppliers admitted to buying illegally imported Chinese honey, including some that was adulterated with unauthorized antibiotics, to avoid $180 million in U.S. duties. More information on these enforcement activities can be found under "media news” in the True Source Honey website’s newsroom.

In addition to being undercut in the marketplace, American beekeepers have been expressing growing alarm at the severe loss of bee colonies due to colony collapse disorder. Some beekeepers have reported losses of over 50% of their bee population.

The True Source Certified™ program was launched by a group of concerned North American honey companies and importers. It provides audits by an internationally recognized third-party firm that certifies the source of honey from hive to table.

True Source Honey, LLC is an effort by a number of honey companies and importers to call attention to the problem of illegally sourced honey; to encourage action to protect consumers and customers from these practices; and to highlight and support legal, transparent and ethical sourcing. The initiative seeks to help maintain the reputation of honey as a high-quality, highly valued food and further sustain the U.S. honey sector. For more information, visit www.TrueSourceHoney.com and follow us on Facebook.


"Just look for the ‘True Source Certified’ logo,” said Randy Verhoek, president of the American Honey Producers Association. "That logo tells you that the honey you’re buying was ethically and legally sourced. If you don’t see the logo, ask your retailer or honey company to join the program. And make sure that your favorite foods that feature honey – from breakfast cereals to snacks – are made by a food manufacturer who purchases honey from a True Source Certified honey company.

"By taking this simple step, you help ensure quality, and you also help keep U.S. beekeepers in business, by preventing the sale of inferior, underpriced and illegally sourced honey,” he said.

The True Source Certified™ program has been applauded by U.S. beekeepers and honey industry leadership, including the American Honey Producers Association and the American Beekeeping Federation, the two largest organizations for U.S. beekeepers. One of the main reasons is that it provides traceability from hive to table, helping ensure the food safety and security of the honey used in the United States.

To meet its honey demand, the United States imports more than 60% of the honey it needs from other countries. Most imported and domestic honey is from high-quality, legal sources. But some honey brokers and importers illegally circumvent tariffs and quality controls, selling honey to U.S. companies that is of questionable origin – specifically, illegally imported Chinese honey. This threatens the U.S. honey industry by undercutting fair market prices and damaging honey's reputation for quality and safety.

"Cheap illegal imports hurt all legitimate U.S. packers and beekeepers,” said George Hansen, president of the American Beekeeping Federation. "We’re facing the collapse of our colonies on the one hand, and unfair competition in the marketplace on the other. Consumers have the power to help U.S. beekeepers maintain their footing in extremely tough times – and to ensure the quality of the honey they buy.”

Seven honey companies and a number of importers and international exporters are now True Source Certified or registered, representing about one-third of honey sold in North America. Many of the largest grocery retailers and club stores now only use certified honey for their store brands, including Costco (Kirkland Signature) and Target (Market Pantry and Simply Balanced). But the program still has a way to go until consumers can be confident in the source of their honey.

"Interest is growing in the program, but we need the help of consumers to raise the level of awareness and commitment,” said True Source Honey Executive Director Gordon Marks. "We ask people to look for the label, and to check out www.TrueSourceHoney.com if they have questions about the program or want to do more.”

Even with recent indictments by federal authorities against companies illegally importing Chinese honey, there are indications that millions of pounds of illegally sourced honey may continue to enter the United States. In February of this year, two of the nation’s largest honey suppliers admitted to buying illegally imported Chinese honey, including some that was adulterated with unauthorized antibiotics, to avoid $180 million in U.S. duties. More information on these enforcement activities can be found under "media news” in the True Source Honey website’s newsroom.

In addition to being undercut in the marketplace, American beekeepers have been expressing growing alarm at the severe loss of bee colonies due to colony collapse disorder. Some beekeepers have reported losses of over 50% of their bee population.

The True Source Certified™ program was launched by a group of concerned North American honey companies and importers. It provides audits by an internationally recognized third-party firm that certifies the source of honey from hive to table.

True Source Honey, LLC is an effort by a number of honey companies and importers to call attention to the problem of illegally sourced honey; to encourage action to protect consumers and customers from these practices; and to highlight and support legal, transparent and ethical sourcing. The initiative seeks to help maintain the reputation of honey as a high-quality, highly valued food and further sustain the U.S. honey sector. For more information, visit www.TrueSourceHoney.com and follow us on Facebook.

 

 

 

Chefs and Mixologists Abuzz about Honey:

Honey Food and Beverage Summit

The National Honey Board recently convened an elite group of chefs and mixologists at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in San Antonio for Honey Summit 2013—Food & Beverage, an event designed to inspire cross-menu innovation using honey.

A dozen expert culinarians participated in the two-and-a-half-day immersion event that featured honey varietal tastings, food and beverage demonstrations, panel discussions and hands-on production and innovation sessions in the CIA’s famed kitchens.

The Honey Summit kicked off with "Honey 101,” a primer on honey, led by CIA Chef Instructor Almir Da Fonseca. The session included honey’s various forms, including liquid, whipped and in the comb, as well as solid forms such as granules. The chefs became increasingly animated as they discussed the possibilities of essentially utilizing honey "nose-to-tail.”

"I was happy to learn that honey comes in several forms,” says Larry Leibowitz of Guckenheimer Enterprises. "The whipped variety has a great function in baking and pastry. The granular honey is great for beverages as well. It can be used to rim the glass of a cocktail or added to a parfait for color and texture.” The chefs also learned about honey’s impressive functionality, including its inherent humectant, emulsive and antimicrobial properties.

Barry Lofton of Joe’s Crab Shack summed up his experience by saying, "The Honey Summit was an excellent experience. It really broadened my horizons to the nuances between all of the varietals of honey and what we could do with them in our cooking, and how we can use it to enhance the flavors of the food we prepare.”

”I think I took honey for granted before coming here,” added Guckenheimer’s Larry Leibowitz. "After learning a little more from the group of chefs we worked with, it was amazing to see how versatile honey is.”

The food and beverage-focused Honey Summit ended with everyone in high spirits, eager to apply their new knowledge about honey in their own operations. Chipotle’s Tatiana Perea was already off and running, headed back to New York City with plans to serve several honey inspired menu items at a VIP dinner the following day. The National Honey Board anticipates ongoing honey food and beverage innovation coming out of the Honey Summit.

Honey Summit 2013 - Food and Beverage Innovation Chef Participants:

Applebee’s–Patrick Humphrey, Executive Chef Culinary Innovation & Development

Bob Evans–Brian Wilson, Sr. Culinary Development Chef

Buttes Marriott Resort– Gregory Wiener, Executive Chef & Director of Restaurants

Chipotle Mexican Grill–Tatiana Perea, Culinary Manager/Test Kitchen Supervisor

Einstein Bros. Bagels–DJ Lonergan, Corporate Executive Chef

Guckenheimer Enterprises–Larry Leibowitz, Director of Culinary Operations

Manchester Grand Hyatt San Diego–Luis Aniceto, Pastry Chef

Joe’s Crab Shack–Barry Lofton, Director of Innovation

KOR Food Innovation–John Csukor, President

Liquid Architecture–Kim Haasarud, Liquid Chef/Restaurant Industry Consultant

Millennium Knickerbocker Hotel–Valeria Benner, Executive Chef

Phillips Seafood Restaurants–John Knorr, Sr. VP of Product Development

Sysco–Neil Doherty, Director of Culinary Development

Vitamix–Bev Shaffer, Chef/Recipe Development, Commercial and Consumer



CATCH THE BUZZ

Monsanto Announces Clinton Global Initiative Commitment on Honey Bee Health

Investment Launches Coalition to Research the Challenges Facing Honey Bees

Monsanto recently announced its commitment to honey bee health at the 2013 Clinton Global Initiative Annual Meeting with support from the Keystone Center, The American Honey Producers Association, The American Beekeeping Federation, The World Wildlife Fund, and Project Apis m. (PAm), plus several commodity groups.

A significant decline in the honey bee population is posing a threat to agricultural sustainability and food security, as well as to ecosystem health and biodiversity, thus the coalition will have four priority areas of focus: 1) improving honey bee nutrition; 2) providing research investment in novel technology for varroa and virus control; 3) understanding science-based approaches to studying pesticide impacts on honey bees and increasing awareness of pesticide best management practices among growers and beekeepers; and 4) enabling economic empowerment of beekeepers.

Monsanto has been involved with bee research since 2011 when it acquired Beeologics, an organization focused on researching and testing biological products to provide targeted control of pests and diseases in order to provide safe, effective ways to protect the honey bee. Monsanto also has collaborated with PAm to assist in forage projects in order to provide more nutritious food for bees, and is doing extensive research on the varroa mite, which may be one factor in the decline of honey bee health.

 



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Cassie Cox
Executive Secretary
PO Box 435
Mendon, UT 84325
office:281-900-9740
cassie@AHPAnet.com